I’m Sarah.

After graduating college, I worked as a TV news reporter at an NBC affiliate outside of Chicago. I then retired from that life to be a stay at home mom to my three little ones. While at home I was able to rekindle my love for decorating and crafts. A blog seemed like the perfect place to share those ideas. There is inspiration everywhere, I hope you find some here.

photography 101: using a fill flash + flash diffuser

photography 101: using a fill flash + flash diffuser

fill-flash.jpg

While we were on vacation in Michigan, we walked down to the waterfront to watch the sunset. I thought this was a great chance for me to use my fill flash, and to tell you a little bit about it.

Fill Flash:
When the camera is not able to photograph both the background and foreground in equal detail because of the brightly lit background, a fill light (flash) is needed.

In order to get equal light on the subject when the background is bright, you can use either the built in flash on your camera or a mounted flash. I have a built in flash, but I sometimes need the stronger flash that a mounted flash provides. Using a flash is a great way to add just a little bit more light to shadows.
{just FIY my husband was in a heated stone skipping competition with my brother-in-law while I kept having him pose for these pictures, I think it was throwing off his game}

When you don't use a flash, and there is light in the background, the background looks great, but the subject is really dark because there is so much light behind him.

When I used the flash, it washed out the background and makes the picture seem a little un natural, like the background is fake. So what do you do? No flash: the photo looks bad. With flash: the photo looks bad. The answer: a flash diffuser.

Flash Diffuser:
A flash diffuser softens the light that a flash provides. Allowing the photograph to have more even light on the foreground and background, making it look more natural. For my mounted flash, I use a soft box diffuser like this. There are many different types of flash diffusers and flash reflectors for mounted flashes.
To get this picture, I used a flash and a diffuser. The flash diffuser softened the flash a little while still giving ample light to the subject.

For a built in camera flash, there are a few simple things you can use as a flash diffuser if you don't want to go out and buy a mounted flash with a soft box. They are:
A little piece of scotch tape
A coffee filter
White tissue paper
A thin piece of white cloth
You can just hold up those things in front of your camera's flash or tape them on. I actually have a little piece of scotch tape permanently on my built in camera flash.

You can also use a little white business card and hold it up in front of your flash allowing the light from your flash to bounce off the wall or ceiling.

Things to remember about using a flash and flash diffuser:
1. When there is not enough light on the subject of your photograph, use a flash. Either one built in to your camera or one that mounts on top of it like this one.
2. To soften your flash, use a flash diffuser. Either one like this for a mounted flash or white tissue paper or coffee filter held up or taped in front of your built in camera flash.
3. To avoid the dreaded flash shadow, use a flash diffuser or stand further away from the wall or background.
4. Bounce your mounted flash off a wall or ceiling if yours has that capacity.
5. You can also mount your flash above your camera using a strobe frame, sometimes when the flash is not directly on the subject, it eliminates harsh shadows from the flash.
6. To reduce red eye (which often occurs when using a flash): use the red eye reduction option on your camera, edit out the red eyes in your editing software such as PicMonkey, turn up the lights in the room, or photograph at an angle so that the flash doesn't bounce directly off the back of the subjects pupils.

market bag giveaway {winner}

market bag giveaway {winner}

double chocolate chip cookies

double chocolate chip cookies

0