I’m Sarah.

After graduating college, I worked as a TV news reporter at an NBC affiliate outside of Chicago. I then retired from that life to be a stay at home mom to my three little ones. While at home I was able to rekindle my love for decorating and crafts. A blog seemed like the perfect place to share those ideas. There is inspiration everywhere, I hope you find some here.

photography 101: {ISO}

photography 101: {ISO}

IMG_7525-b.jpg

Have you ever taken a picture with your settings on "auto" assuming that no matter what you should end up with an awesome picture... but then you blow up the pictures and see that they are all grainy? That grain or "noise" is something caused by your ISO setting. So that is what I want to talk to you today about. Because really, until I took my photography class, I didn't quite understand it that well.

ISO: How sensitive the image sensor is to the amount of light present.

{photo source: here}

ISO is a setting on your camera that you can control when you are in manual or a different setting other than auto. It allows you to increase or decrease the amount of sensitivity your camera has to light. The typical ISO settings range from 100-3200. There is also an "auto" ISO setting. Higher numbers are generally used for: low light situations and fast action situations, when you need a fast shutter speed. So why not always leave your camera in a high ISO setting to let as much light in as possible? Well, as you will find out very quickly, the higher the ISO, the more grain or "noise" that appears in your photographs, because of the high sensitivity to light. So if it is a little dark outside and you bump up your ISO to make the photo brighter, it will most likely turn out to be very grainy. Which is such a bummer because you don't always notice that while you are taking the picture. It is sometimes difficult to notice the noise caused by a high ISO setting. But in the pictures below, you can kind of see the grainy resolution in some of the photos. I really only notice it when I blow the picture up. But especially with portraits, it is very noticeable. It takes away the smooth, crispness that a good photo can provide.

Changing the ISO can also help when you are taking pictures in very bright sun and the pictures look overexposed, you can lower the ISO, or sensitivity to light. As a rule of thumb, I don't ever put my ISO above 800.

So then you might think, ok, if the ISO is too high, the picture is grainy, then I will always keep the ISO at a low number. The only problem with that is when you are shooting indoors or in lower light and, more light needs to be let in so the shutter stays open for a long time. And unless you have a tripod, it can be impossible to keep the camera steady for that long and your photo will end up blurry, like in the picture below. I took this picture indoors, at 100, it was blurry because the shutter was open for so long, at 3200, the photo was grainy, so 800 was a happy medium.

When shooting in auto... B E W A R E! When shooting indoors, you camera will automatically sense there is less light and so it will set your ISO at a high number, so your photos will be grainy. Don't ever assume you are safe taking pictures in auto. That's why it is so valuable as a photographer to understand all of the settings on your camera so that you can switch it accordingly to make sure you get the best photograph.

Things to remember about ISO:
1. The ISO manages the sensitivity to light.
2. The higher the ISO number, the more light will be allowed to enter the photo, however, the more grain or "noise" will also appear in a photo. Better for low light settings.
3. The lower the ISO number, the less light will be allowed to enter the photo, however, the more crisp the photo will be. Better for situations with lots of light.
4. An ISO of 800 is a good setting to keep your camera on.

just a peek inside my closet

just a peek inside my closet

pumpkin chocolate chip cookies + toasted pumpkin seeds

pumpkin chocolate chip cookies + toasted pumpkin seeds

0